My Summer 2015 Reading List

Confession time. These are the books I am reading right now, started a while ago and hope to finish, or plan to start and complete before the leaves begin to turn. The fact that I have not finished what I have started is no reflection on the book or the author. It is a reflection on me and the circumstances in which I find myself. All of these volumes are well worth your time … assuming you don’t have too large a backlog of titles of your own.

A Question of Character: A Life of John F. Kennedy
By Thomas Reeves

Before there was WJC, there was JFK. This book, recommended to me by a Facebook friend, is a fascinating account of how a deeply flawed and manipulative man was made president.

Saint Peter’s Fair (The Chronicles of Brother Cadfael Book 4)
By Ellis Peters

My first exposure to the well-known mystery series. Overwritten at times. Doesn’t demand a lot of the reader but holds your interest and keeps you guessing. Christine is reading this book to me.

Empire’s End: A Novel
By Jerry B. Jenkins

The latest historical novel on the life of Paul, written by one of my favorite Christian authors.

Blind Spots: Becoming a Courageous, Compassionate, and Commissioned Church
By Collin Hansen

Collin was one of the brightest people on CT’s hallway and is now a big shooter with The Gospel Coalition and a new church pastor in Alabama. If this book matches Collin’s careful intellect and compassionate heart, I expect it to do a lot of good for the cause of Christ.

Discovering God: The Origins of the Great Religions and the Evolution of Belief
By Rodney Stark

An endlessly fascinating survey not only of the monotheistic faiths but of the Eastern religions, as well as ancient paganism. Stark says the global faiths that hold sway today—other than Islam—got their starts or underwent major innivations about the same time. He suggests that God was guiding the process as man’s understanding of religious matters enlarged. Whether I end up agreeing with his thesis, my understanding of the development of religion has been deepened greatly.

What Your Body Knows about God: How We Are Designed to Connect, Serve and Thrive
By Rob Moll

Everyone else has read this book, which somehow got lost in the Guthrie shuffle, so I should, too. In fact, I wish I’d written it! I expect to learn a ton from Rob’s careful reporting and sage insights. Rob also worked with me at CT and now serves World Vision with his considerable editorial and journalistic skills.

How We Love: Discover Your Love Style, Enhance Your Marriage
By Milan and Kay Yerkovich

Recommended by a friend.

Yawning at Tigers: You Can’t Tame God, So Stop Trying
By Drew Dyck

I put this book down a year ago, but a lot of other people haven’t been able to. Drew’s book just topped the Christian Living category at the Word Guild’s 2014 Word Awards. Drew, a former colleague at CTI, has written a helpful book on the majesty and unpredictability of God, and it’s high time I finished it.

About Stan Guthrie

Stan Guthrie is an editor at large for Christianity Today magazine and for the Chuck Colson Center for Christian Worldview. His latest book is God's Story in 66 Verses. He also is author of All that Jesus Asks: How His Questions Can Teach and Transform Us, Missions in the Third Millennium: 21 Key Trends for the 21st Century, and A Concise Guide to Bible Prophecy. He is co-author of The Sacrament of Evangelism. Besides authoring, writing, and editing books, Stan is a literary agent, bringing together good authors, good books, and good publishers. Stan writes the monthly Priorities colum for BreakPoint.org. He has appeared on National Public Radio's €œTell Me More,€ WGN's Milt Rosenberg program, and many Christian shows, including The Eric Metaxas Show and Moody Radio'€™s €œNew Day Florida.€ A licensed minister and an inspirational speaker, he served as moderator for the Christian Book Expo panel discussion, Does the God of Christianity Exist, and What Difference Does It Make?
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